The Telegraph UK animal pictures of the week, some of mine this morning

The Telegraph in Uk have some excellent pictures this week, here are some of them.

A cheeky crow tries to hitch a ride on an eagle mid-flight) in Kyeonggi-do, South Korea. Photographer Hyeongchol Kim caught the smaller bird saving some energy by swooping in on the eagle and perching on its back.

You have all seen the NASA Space Shuttles piggyback on a 747, this is equal. 

A cheeky crow tries to hitch a ride on an eagle mid-flight in Kyeonggi-do, South Korea. Photographer Hyeongchol Kim caught the smaller bird saving some energy by swooping in on the eagle and perching on its back.  Picture: Hyeongchol Kim / CATERS NEWS

Birds perch on a branch during a spring snowstorm in Pembroke, N.Y., Monday, April 23, 2012. A spring nor'easter packing soaking rain and high winds churned up the Northeast Monday morning, unleashing a burst of winter and up to a foot of snow in higher elevations inland, closing some schools and sparking concerns of power outages. (AP Photo/David Duprey)

Build or purchase some nesting boxes, all these could cuddle in one, and they would be comfortable.

Birds perch on a branch during a spring snowstorm in Pembroke, N.Y. Picture: AP Photo/David Duprey

A mother goose with an early brood, they are well insulated and ok

Canada geese and goslings paddle in a spring snow shower in Pembroke, N.Y. Picture: AP Photo/David Duprey

Canada geese and goslings travel in a spring snow in Pembroke, N.Y., Monday, April 23, 2012. (AP Photo/David Duprey

A Southern elephant seal bull has its nose picked by a bird of prey called a Striated Caracara on Sea Lion Island in the Falklands. The bird explored the elephant seal's nose for three minutes, feeding on parasites.

Smiling and content Elephant Seal, enjoying a nose job. 

A Southern elephant seal bull has its nose picked by a bird of prey called a Striated Caracara on Sea Lion Island in the Falklands. The bird explored the elephant seal’s nose for three minutes, feeding on parasites.Picture: Dickie Duckett/FLPA/Solent News & Photo Agency

Telegraph reader Jenny McGoey spotted this deer getting a spring-clean courtesy of a nest-building bird in Bushy Park, London. If you have a photograph you'd like us to consider for a picture gallery, please email it to my

Wow, fresh nesting material, and plenty of it.

Telegraph reader Jenny McGoey spotted this deer getting a trim courtesy of a nest-building bird in Bushy Park, London. If you have a photograph you’d like us to consider for a picture gallery, please email it to mypic@telegraph.co.ukPicture: Jenny McGoey

Male pheasants fight for feeding grounds and females. Wildlife photographer Richard Peters who caught the feisty pair on camera on farm land in Hertfordshire said: 'I couldn't believe how vicious they were.'

Pheasant Cock fight, could go to the bitter end.

Male pheasants fight for feeding grounds and females. Wildlife photographer Richard Peters who caught the feisty pair on camera on farm land in Hertfordshire said: I couldn’t believe how vicious they were.Picture: Richard Peters / Rex Features

Here you see all the pictures, thank you to The Telegraph UK

and here are some hummingbirds and squirrels  at my place this morning.

The wings so fast, my camera could't capture the beats, up to 80 times pr. second

"Rufus" hummingbird coming in for landing, feed is one part sugar to 4 parts water, 5 parts on very hot days

Hard to say how many, but they fly off in different directions after feeding, and emtying the feeder in a few days, constant visitors from morning to night

Lots of work, opening all these bird seeds, but they taste very good, a morning sun ray in the face

And it is only early spring, looking forward to a long season with all my friends

Hummingbird info  Hummingbirds are birds that comprise the family Trochilidae. They are among the smallest of birds, most species measuring in the 7.5–13 cm (3–5 in) range. Indeed, the smallest extant bird species is a hummingbird, the 5-cm Bee Hummingbird. They can hover in mid-air by rapidly flapping their wings 12–80 times per second (depending on the species). They are also the only group of birds able to fly backwards.[1] Their English name derives from the characteristic hum made by their rapid wing beats. They can fly at speeds exceeding 15 m/s (54 km/h; 34 mph).[2]

Kolibri images

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